Set-top Boxes Open Up

“However, many assert that it’s Microsoft Corp. –which doesn’t make STBs and is often accused of attempting to lock in users to its own priority technologies %u2013 that has done the most to advance the role of the set-top box. “

I always love it when a writer makes a vauge reference to some nebulous 3rd party like “many”. Who are these “many”? “However, many assert that it’s Microsoft Corp. – which doesn’t make STBs and is often accused of attempting to lock in users to its own priority technologies – that has done the most to advance the role of the set-top box.However, many assert that it’s Microsoft Corp. – which doesn’t make STBs and is often accused of attempting to lock in users to its own priority technologies – that has done the most to advance the role of the set-top box.”

I have never met anyone, anywhere that would assert Microsoft has ever done anything but “open” hardware in an attempt to dominate a market. Microsoft creates the appearance of openness while denying to others the benefits thereof.

While multi-function devices like the Xbox 360 are very interesting and may help IPTV service providers differentiate service, remember this too is a Microsoft controlled platform.

Technologies such as OCAP provide a level playing field for a number of companies wishing to innovate on a cable operators network. While OCAP may not prove to be a panacea, technologies such as OCAP, where everyone has access to the platform, will do more to open up the STB market than anything Microsoft has ever or will ever do.